Teaching in a Digital World-Deanne Drayton


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Too Cool To Cyberbully

My last entry for my blog is a poster for topic 11.

Unfortunately the blue was meant to be the entire background but when I saved it to pdf it came out the way it has, not sure why that has happened.

I believe this is a very important topic cyberbullying. Adults also now find them selves targets of cyberbullying not just children and teens, bullying has been taken to a whole new level with technology and it is something I would like to see stopped.cyberbullying poster-page-001I have added the link to the actually word document that I used to produce the poster.

Cyberbully poster

References:

Bart Simpson [image] (2014). Retrieved, 13 November 2014 from http://gallery.mobile9.com/f/1487914/.

Commonwealth of Australia, (2014). How do I deal with…Cyberbullying. Retrieved, 13 November 2014 from www.cybersmart.gov.au/teens/how%20do%201%20deal%20with/cuberbullying.aspx.

Stop Cyberbullying [image], (2013). Retrieved, 17 November 2014 from http://stopcyberbullying.org/index2.html.

What is cyberbullying exactly? Retrieved, 17 November 2014 from http://stopcyberbullying.org.

 

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Evaluation Rubric & Feedback

Providing the right kind of feedback is important. As a teacher it is important to provide a supportive and caring environment; an environment where their teacher provides effective feedback. Effective feedback must translate into a clear, positive message that students connect with (Brookhart, 2007). It is important to tell students why they are going wrong so they can learn more appropriate strategies (Bangert-Drowns et al. 1991).

We were required to evaluate two of our peers using the rubric provided and to also provide feedback on how they could improve their blog and in turn my two peers from the same group assessed me. I assessed Kate Braunberger and Roxanne Tolomeo’s blogs. The feedback for my blog was clear and direct as to where I was going wrong and suggestions were offered on how to improve my work. I found the feedback to be constructive and thoughtful. The critique was not harsh which can have a negative impact but was conducted in a positive manner.

The way teachers provide feedback to students can either encourage and support learning or turn students off (Woolfolk & Margetts, 2013)

References:

Bangert-Drowns, R.L., Kulik, C. C., Kulik, J. A.  & Morgan, M. (1991). The instructional effect of feedback in test-like events. Review of Educational Research, 61, 213-238.

Brookhart, S. (2007). Feedback that fits all. Informative Assessment, 65(4), 54-59.

Woolfolk, A. & Margetts, K. (2013). Educational Psychology. Pearson, Australia.

Below are the attachments for the blogs I assessed.

Peer Marking: Blog                                                                                                     Name of Marker: Deanne Drayton

Name of Blog Creator: ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Kate Braunberger

Evidence of minimal/incomplete awareness and engagement

Grade: F

Some evidence of awareness, understanding and engagement with concepts, skills, and dispositions

Grade: P

Sound evidence of awareness, understanding and engagement with concepts, skills, and dispositions

Grade: C

Consistent, wide-ranging evidence of awareness, understanding and engagement with concepts, skills, and dispositions

Grade: D

Exemplary awareness, understanding and engagement with concepts, skills, and dispositions, which is generally well above expectations

Grade: HD

Content
Content and ideas:

Connection to unit content/tasks.

Blog posts are unstructured without connections to unit concepts, ideas or learning tasks. Some content or posts may be missing. Blog posts have limited linkage to unit concepts, ideas or learning tasks. There may be a lack of focus in several. Blog posts provide a mostly clear and thoughtful response to the unit content/learning tasks, although some posts may lack focus. Blog posts provide a clear, thoughtful and mostly focused response to the unit content/learning tasks. All blog posts provide a coherent, focused and insightful response to unit content/ learning tasks.
Teaching ideas Posts do not include teaching idea. Most posts include one teaching idea. Most posts include one teaching idea, some are linked to theory. Most posts include one teaching idea which is linked to theory. All posts include one teaching idea which is linked to theory.
Written response to peer feedback Peer feedback and response missing. Includes two samples of peer feedback and 200 word response to feedback. Includes two samples of peer feedback and focused 200 word response to feedback. Includes two samples of peer feedback and focused 200 word response to feedback. Some evaluative elements. Includes two samples of peer feedback and focused 200 word critical response to feedback.
Evidence of weekly tasks Weekly task efforts not included or less than 3 weekly tasks included. Evidence of at least 3 weekly tasks. Evidence of more than 3 weekly tasks. Evidence of most weekly tasks. Evidence of tasks from Week 3-8 but may also incorporate task efforts from other weeks.
Degree of reflection rather than description Blog posts limited to description of tasks and unit content. No evidence of reflection on strengths, weaknesses or goals. Blog posts have limited information about how understanding has changed. Limited evidence of reflection on strengths, weaknesses or goals. Some blog posts consider how understanding has changed, but lacks any examples or comparisons. Some evidence of reflection on strengths, weaknesses or goals. Blog posts give some evidence to show how understanding has changed. Demonstrates the ability to articulate some strengths, weaknesses and goals for future improvement. Blog posts gives specific detail and examples and comparisons to show how understanding has changed. Demonstrates the ability to clearly articulate strengths, weaknesses and goals for future improvement.
Text Layout, use of graphics, task inclusion
Blog Design No graphics or low quality graphics only which do not enhance and complement the content. Poor choice of template. Lacks aesthetic appeal. Graphics of variable quality or size. Limited evidence of design elements (contrast, repetition, alignment, proximity) and visual appeal in blog design Template used may not be appropriate. Mostly good quality graphics. Evidence of design elements being utilised to improve the visual appeal and functionality of the blog. Mostly high quality original graphics and multimedia that enhance the content. Evidence of design elements incorporated into the blog design to achieve a professional appearance and high level functionality/ organisation. Selects and uses high quality, original graphics. These are well annotated. Design is consistent, and appropriate and enhances the visual appeal and readability of the blog. Design is personalised and may have some innovative features. Images or links to tasks from Week 3 to 8 included.
Academic Skills
Organisation and coherence Lacks coherence in and/or between sentences. No evidence of awareness of audience. Lacks student voice. Post style does not consider audience and there is little evidence of student voice. Sentences may be limited in type or inappropriately connected. Range of sentence types which are usually appropriately connected. Style is clear with some evidence of student voice. Posts reflect student personality to some extent. Range of appropriately connected sentence types. Writing style is generally appropriate for the audience and an attempt is made to use a consistent voice. Posts reflect the author’s personality and has a strong sense of voice. Sentences are coherent and well connected.
Grammar and accuracy (including spelling and punctuation) Many grammatical errors and/or use of a limited vocabulary, which may include inappropriate usage. Numerous spelling and/or punctuation errors. Some grammatical errors and/or use of a limited vocabulary which may include inappropriate usage. Spelling and/or punctuation errors. Some grammatical errors in complex forms, and/or may include a more limited vocabulary range. Few spelling and/or punctuation errors. A range of contextually appropriate vocabulary and few, if any, grammatical errors. Very few or no spelling or punctuation errors. A wide range of contextually appropriate vocabulary and no grammatical errors. No spelling or punctuation errors.
Referencing Ideas of others used without acknowledgement. Ideas acknowledged but may not be APA style. Referencing resembles APA style. Referencing is APA style with very few errors. Referencing is APA style and error free.
Comments (Make these specific and constructive. What was good about your peer’s blog? What could they do to make it better before they submit?):

I would watch your sentence paragraph construction; some of your paragraphs could be divided into smaller paragraphs. I have done the same thing thinking that hyperlinks are automatically generated, I suggest hyperlinking to your games. Just check for grammatical errors. Just check image size as well, perhaps the blog main image is a little too large. Great reflection.

Overall a good blog.

Grade Average: F/P/C/D/HD

Blog_Rubric_Peer_Marking_Kate_Braunberger  this is the actually document.

Peer Marking: Blog                                                                                                     Name of Marker: Deanne Drayton

Name of Blog Creator: ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Roxanne Tolomeo

Evidence of minimal/incomplete awareness and engagement

Grade: F

Some evidence of awareness, understanding and engagement with concepts, skills, and dispositions

Grade: P

Sound evidence of awareness, understanding and engagement with concepts, skills, and dispositions

Grade: C

Consistent, wide-ranging evidence of awareness, understanding and engagement with concepts, skills, and dispositions

Grade: D

Exemplary awareness, understanding and engagement with concepts, skills, and dispositions, which is generally well above expectations

Grade: HD

Content
Content and ideas:

Connection to unit content/tasks.

Blog posts are unstructured without connections to unit concepts, ideas or learning tasks. Some content or posts may be missing. Blog posts have limited linkage to unit concepts, ideas or learning tasks. There may be a lack of focus in several. Blog posts provide a mostly clear and thoughtful response to the unit content/learning tasks, although some posts may lack focus. Blog posts provide a clear, thoughtful and mostly focused response to the unit content/learning tasks. All blog posts provide a coherent, focused and insightful response to unit content/ learning tasks.
Teaching ideas Posts do not include teaching idea. Most posts include one teaching idea. Most posts include one teaching idea, some are linked to theory. Most posts include one teaching idea which is linked to theory. All posts include one teaching idea which is linked to theory.
Written response to peer feedback Peer feedback and response missing. Includes two samples of peer feedback and 200 word response to feedback. Includes two samples of peer feedback and focused 200 word response to feedback. Includes two samples of peer feedback and focused 200 word response to feedback. Some evaluative elements. Includes two samples of peer feedback and focused 200 word critical response to feedback.
Evidence of weekly tasks Weekly task efforts not included or less than 3 weekly tasks included. Evidence of at least 3 weekly tasks. Evidence of more than 3 weekly tasks. Evidence of most weekly tasks. Evidence of tasks from Week 3-8 but may also incorporate task efforts from other weeks.
Degree of reflection rather than description Blog posts limited to description of tasks and unit content. No evidence of reflection on strengths, weaknesses or goals. Blog posts have limited information about how understanding has changed. Limited evidence of reflection on strengths, weaknesses or goals. Some blog posts consider how understanding has changed, but lacks any examples or comparisons. Some evidence of reflection on strengths, weaknesses or goals. Blog posts give some evidence to show how understanding has changed. Demonstrates the ability to articulate some strengths, weaknesses and goals for future improvement. Blog posts gives specific detail and examples and comparisons to show how understanding has changed. Demonstrates the ability to clearly articulate strengths, weaknesses and goals for future improvement.
Text Layout, use of graphics, task inclusion
Blog Design No graphics or low quality graphics only which do not enhance and complement the content. Poor choice of template. Lacks aesthetic appeal. Graphics of variable quality or size. Limited evidence of design elements (contrast, repetition, alignment, proximity) and visual appeal in blog design Template used may not be appropriate. Mostly good quality graphics. Evidence of design elements being utilised to improve the visual appeal and functionality of the blog. Mostly high quality original graphics and multimedia that enhance the content. Evidence of design elements incorporated into the blog design to achieve a professional appearance and high level functionality/ organisation. Selects and uses high quality, original graphics. These are well annotated. Design is consistent, and appropriate and enhances the visual appeal and readability of the blog. Design is personalised and may have some innovative features. Images or links to tasks from Week 3 to 8 included.
Academic Skills
Organisation and coherence Lacks coherence in and/or between sentences. No evidence of awareness of audience. Lacks student voice. Post style does not consider audience and there is little evidence of student voice. Sentences may be limited in type or inappropriately connected. Range of sentence types which are usually appropriately connected. Style is clear with some evidence of student voice. Posts reflect student personality to some extent. Range of appropriately connected sentence types. Writing style is generally appropriate for the audience and an attempt is made to use a consistent voice. Posts reflect the author’s personality and has a strong sense of voice. Sentences are coherent and well connected.
Grammar and accuracy (including spelling and punctuation) Many grammatical errors and/or use of a limited vocabulary, which may include inappropriate usage. Numerous spelling and/or punctuation errors. Some grammatical errors and/or use of a limited vocabulary which may include inappropriate usage. Spelling and/or punctuation errors. Some grammatical errors in complex forms, and/or may include a more limited vocabulary range. Few spelling and/or punctuation errors. A range of contextually appropriate vocabulary and few, if any, grammatical errors. Very few or no spelling or punctuation errors. A wide range of contextually appropriate vocabulary and no grammatical errors. No spelling or punctuation errors.
Referencing Ideas of others used without acknowledgement. Ideas acknowledged but may not be APA style. Referencing resembles APA style. Referencing is APA style with very few errors. Referencing is APA style and error free.
Comments (Make these specific and constructive. What was good about your peer’s blog? What could they do to make it better before they submit?):

Just check your grammar. Watch for sentence connectivity particularly towards the end of your blog topics some sentences could have been separated into new paragraphs. In topic 5 you started off a sentence with ‘I also did further research’ I am just wondering if you could use a better word than did, to me it doesn’t read well.

Overall I enjoyed your blog, it was very well thought out with referenced content. Good luck.

Grade Average: F/P/C/D/HD

Blog_Rubric_Peer_Marking_Roxanne_Tolomeo this is the actually document.

I have also attached their evaluations of my blog.

Roxanne

Blog_Rubric_Peer_Marking_Deanne Drayton

Kate

Blog_Rubric_Peer_Marking_Deanne Drayton


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Lifelong Learning

lifelong learning

Image source: www.glogster.com/loryrous/commit-yourself-to-lifelong-learning-/g-6l5o4vpbt7t84ihmdv1r0a0

This week we looked at lifelong learning and how education helps to develop skills for learning well beyond our academic lives. Educational outcomes are no longer restricted to the years of formal schooling; we are now concerned with developing the skills and aptitudes in our students that will ensure they engage with learning across their lifetime (Howell, 2012). I saw this while I was part of the Committee of Management of the Neighbourhood Center in my town; the center provided a number of general interest programs, such as looking after chickens to Fungi identification especially the ones you should stay away from. I can also use myself as an example, I have been putting together a website for my business and I have put in a lot of time researching the best way to have my site recognised high up in search engines; I have learnt quite a lot about search engine optimisation; having access to a wealth of information online is invaluable when it comes to pursuing your knowledge on topics of interest. Policy also plays a part in what we teach, when we teach it and what the desired learning outcomes are (Howell, 2012). The policy surrounding technology use in Australia is driven by a number of key factors; what is happening around the world, such as the shift towards a global knowledge based society; the changing nature of professions and workplaces; the impact of eCommerce and how we now make money and the digitising of our personal lives and recreational pursuits (Howell, 2012). Lifelong learning is defined as learning that is pursued throughout life; it is flexible, diverse and available at different times and different places (LLCQ, 2014). I for one know I will continue to learn, especially about those topics I am passionate about.

life-long-learning

Image source: http://blog.vipdesk.com/2011/04/04/lifelong-learning-matters/

We were required this week to use Voki www.voki.com. I choose to do my presentation on The Oceania Project www.oceania.org.au. The Oceania Project is a Not-for –Profit research and information organisation dedicated to the Conservation and Protection of Whales, Dolphins and the Oceans.  I created a mermaid avatar; I thought that was appropriate with an uploaded image of a whale in the background. Instead of typing what I wanted my mermaid to say, I recorded myself speaking and used my own voice for my mermaid.

Here is my link www.voki.com/pickup.php?scid=10489604&height=267&width=200

Viki

oceania project

I thoroughly enjoyed using Voki , I enjoyed Voki far more than the last 2 weeks using Sploder and Scratch. Voki was easy to navigate around the tools and very easy to create a presentation. I can see as a teacher particularly in early primary, Voki would be a useful tool to use when presenting to the students. The character tells the story which I would imagine would engage the students more than the teacher. From middle to late primary students would easily be able to use Voki to make interesting presentations of their own.

I am quite excited about Voki and I know I would use it in my classroom.

References:

Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT: Digital Pedagogies for Collaboration and Creativity. Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Victoria.

LLCQ, (2014). WHAT IS LIFELONG LEARING? Lifelong Learning Council Queensland Inc. Retrieved 21 October 2014, from http://www.llcq.org.au/01_cms/details.asp?ID=12.

 


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Digital Blurring

This week’s topic was digital blurring; we were asked the question at the beginning of our studies, ‘are you more digital in some parts of your life than in others’. My answer to that is absolutely. I use Facebook, Instagram, I have a website for my business and a blog attached to my website which I have to consistently work on. I work well with Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint, I use Photoshop CS6 on a regular basis but this only scratches the surface of digital technology. Give me a game to play and I have no idea and no patience. I see my 8 year old daughter pick up and use any piece of technology she can get her hands on with ease she has no fear and she is prepared to give it a go which is something we adults do lack when it comes to technology. Students of today know more about technology than their teachers do and students will always know more about technology than their teachers (Prensky, 2007). We need to adopt a fearless approach to technology just as children do.

Incorporating further technology applications in upper primary school to extend on the skill set children already have, such as, digital portfolios to store images, multimedia, blog entries and virtual worlds; Flash (Adobe Flash) is a multimedia platform which can be used to add animation, video and interactivity to webpages; multimedia and mashups; cloud computing; gaming consoles such as Wii fit; Photoshop and Jing where videos can be created with narrations (Howell, 2012). Sadly, however, many teachers lack in this area or are not passionate to apply technology such as those mentioned in the classroom; Prensky (2007) explained teachers could benefit by applying technology in their classrooms; students often observe their teachers as technologically ‘illiterate’ due to their lack of fluency with modern technology, students are aware that this technology is needed for their future. It would be of benefit for teachers to learn to ‘divide the labour’, meaning work with students to understand how the technologies work, what they offer and to understand how to include them in assignments (Prensky, 2007)

digital blurring       Image source: http://massively.joystiq.com/2008/12/06/the-digital-continuum-blurring-the-line-between-co-op-and-mmo/

After watching the Video ‘gaming can make a better world’ I can see Jane’s vision as I am someone who would love to fix all of the world’s problems and I am very passionate about that. I am not a gamer but if I had an opportunity to do good through a game I would be inspired and motivated to play one of these games. To be able to capitalise on the ‘I am better and more success’ in the gaming world (McGonigal, 2010) and utilise this attitude to motivate gamers and have gamers cooperate (McGonigal, 2010) with each other into solving world hunger I feel would be fantastic if it can be achieved. I was listening to JJJ radio the other day and there were game creators explaining their new games, one stood out to me; it was a game from their real life experience of losing their child to cancer, this inspired them to create a game which takes the user through the same experience. The creator believed it would help people going through a similar experience deal with their situation and it would give users who have never been through something like that the opportunity to experience the process of a death of a child through a game. I found this topic controversial as it does deal with a real life situation, not sure I would play it but I can see the pros and cons of a game like this. The way of the future I guess with games that do deal with real life issues.

logo-freerice-ungame-gamesforchangeorgImage source:http://thenewjew.wordpress.com/2007/11/29/solving-the-worlds-problems-one-video-game-at-a-time-12-real-life-video-games-you-should-know-about/
As part of our work this week we were required to create a game with Sploder www.sploder.com. To begin with I had all sorts of trouble with creating the game, when I finally managed to produce the game it then came time for testing; that was where the fun began. I am not a gamer so for me to play my own game was hilarious, I couldn’t manipulate the controls very well at all.
Here is the link to my game Break the House

The first level is pretty easy, once you have scored 6 points you move to the next level which becomes harder as the house structure is reinforced. The house is made up of 3 levels; the bottom level is the strongest, middle medium strength and the top level the weakest.

Capture
I did find Sploder challenging , however, I can see the benefit of allowing students to create their own games as it requires critical thinking and problem solving. I really am not into games so I would say that was where my challenge lied. By allowing students to create games in the classroom and allow them to be creative and perhaps set them a task on solving a small problem, unlike world hunger, who knows they may have an innovative idea to help solve depression in young people or world hunger.

References:

Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT: Digital Pedagogies for Collaboration and Creativity. Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Victoria.

McGonigal, J. (2010). Gaming can make a better world. Retrieved 13 October 2014, from http://www.ted.com/talks/jane_mcgonigal_gaming_can_make_a_better_world#t-210832.

Prensky, M. (2007). How to teach with technology: Keeping both teachers and students comfortable in an era of exponential change. Emerging technologies for learning, 2(4), 40-46.


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Digital Fluency

This week our topic covered digital fluency and how it is important to develop not only our skills but our student’s skills to exist in a digital world. Digital fluency is the ability to sue digital technologies in a confident manner (Howell, 2012). Research has shown that technology when applied affectively increases student learning, understanding, and achievement all while motivating students to learn; technology encourages collaborative learning and helps develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills (Shamir & Korat, 2013). Incorporating word-processing, spread sheets, advanced web searches, animation, game making, podcasting, presentation software, blogging, social networking, movie making and web design in your classroom all helps to build skills and expand a student’s experience with technology. Students learn to create digital content, become technology innovators and in turn digitally fluent with a different range of technologies which build up a repertoire of skills (Howell, 2012) that can be used later in life.

digital-fluency-400x289

Image source:http://langwitches.org/blog/2013/02/18/skilled-literate-fluent-in-the-digital-world/

I found the article, ‘Getting young people fluent in digital’ very inspiring; giving young people the right skills to help them gain employment is far better than bombarding them with a bit of everything. I believe too often in schools particularly high school students are taught a lot of information which may or may not find them employment but to give young people the right skills for employment is far more valuable. I have had to learn as I go using technology due to my age we had minimal digital technology at school and it is hard to learn as you go and takes a lot of time. I believe Fluency is on the right track, training young people in the skills that small businesses need (Social enterprise hub, 2014) it makes far more sense to me. It would be great to see more social enterprises doing the same thing, perhaps secondary schools should take this on board and team with small businesses so young people can develop the skills they require to gain employment.

digital-fluency-2-400x291

Image source: http://langwitches.org/blog/2013/02/18/skilled-literate-fluent-in-the-digital-world/

Our task was this week to produce an animation or game using Scratch scratch.mit.edu/. Scratch allows the user to create stories, games and animations which can be shared with others online.

After making my animation I believe Scratch for a teacher has the potential to create some very useful visual learning aids for the classroom. Students could also use Scratch to create digital content; by developing the animation storyline, planning the story on a storyboard and implementing and completing the task. Students would be able express their creativity along with using critical thinking I believe it would be very engaging and motivating to students as the end product would be their own game or story they have produced..

Scratch was fun to use, allows the user to express creativity and develop problem solving skills, however, I found Scratch to be quite time consuming for a beginner. I also found the activity challenging to make my animation do what I wanted it to do; if motion was not placed in the right order, it was difficult to work. I am sure in time, with patience and practice it would be easy to navigate your way through. I can see Scratch as an exciting education tool with loads of potential once mastered.

Click on the image below and you will be directed to my Scratch animation. To use click on the green flag to begin the animation. Press the space bar for the unicorn to change colour.

stage

References:

Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT: Digital Pedagogies for Collaboration and Creativity. Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Victoria.

Shamir, A. & Korat, O. (2013). TECHNOLOGY AS A SUPPORT FOR LITERACY ACHIEVEMENTS FOR CHILDREN AT RISK. Springer Dordrecht , Heidelberg New York London.

Social enterprise hub,(2014) Getting young people fluent in digital. Guardian News and Media Limited. Retrieved 4 October 2014, from http://www.theguardian.com/social-enterprise-network/2013/aug/02/young-people-fluent-digital.


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Digital Information

digital info

Image source: http://itknowledgeexchange.techtarget.com/quality-assurance/how-private-is-your-digital-life-data-security/

This week’s topic covered learning in a digital world; where our information comes from and the different types of information that we can find on the World Wide Web. Information can come from all over the world and the internet has allowed this connectivity; people have a voice like never before. A lot of the information we find on the internet does not always come from credible sources and it is our job as teachers to be able to research and filter this information for our students.

We now have access to information and news immediately as it comes to hand; no more waiting for the 6pm television news program or the newspaper the next day. Social media, such as twitter, Facebook, blogs and the like offer a platform for everyone to have a voice, however, some of the opinions expressed come from well sourced educated material where as others are simply passionate opinions of an individual.

Choosing good sources means paying attention to who wrote the information, why and how they wrote it (The University if Adelaide, 2014).

dif-new

Image source: https://21cif.com/resources/difcore/

PANDORA-Preserving and Accessing Networked Documentary Resources of Australia http://pandora.nla.gov.au/, is a free information system that is an Australian web archive housing a collection of Australian online Publications which was established in 1995 by the National Library of Australia (National Library of Australia, 1995). After taking a look at what PANDORA has to offer which I didn’t know it existed before this subject, I will be using it in the future to search for credible information

When I am looking for information on the internet, this is dependent on what I am using the information for, if I am putting together an assignment for example, I would look at the references or sources used by a particular article or blog and link back to that source and read and use that information. Wikipedia can be used for background information, however, I always look at the source and go back to that to gather the correct information for my assignment. When looking for credible information there are certain websites that will always be credible, such as government and department of education websites. The take home message for me is to be aware of where the information is coming from and to make sure the source is credible.

We looked at Pinterest and how useful it can be sourcing information. I created a Pinterest board looking at the different types of digital information we encounter. A pin I found particular interesting was 16 ways educators use Pinterest, I shall apply this to my Pinterest account. One thing I have discovered creating my Pinterest board is all the interesting information, tips and how to on Pinterest. I already have a Pinterest account but I wasn’t fully aware of how useful it could be; after this exercise I think I will use Pinterest more often. Pinterest is something that could be introduced to older primary school children and they can learn to make boards to pin information of interest, which then directs them to the source of that information.

This link will take you to my Pinterest board on Digital Information Follow Dee’s board Digital Information on Pinterest.

Capture

References:

National Library of Australia, (1995).  Australia’s Web Archive : About Pandora. Retrieved 23 September 2014, from http://pandora.nla.gov.au/about.html.

The University of Adelaide, (2014). Source Credibility. Retrieved 23 September 2014, from http://www.adelaide.edu.au/writingcentre/learning_guides/learningGuide_sourceCredibility.pdf.

 

 


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The Digital Divide

bridge

Image Source: digitalart / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

This week we looked at the digital divide, the gap between the haves and the have nots of digital technology. With so much global poverty I was not surprised to learn there was a huge gap when it comes to digital technologies. Sadly in Australia we too face a digital divide, many people think we are immune to this, but we are not. As a Youth Services Coordinator and running a youth center in a low socio-economic area, I saw this divide first hand. Lower socio-economic households do not have the same access to technologies as their middle and upper socio-economic counterparts (Howell, 2009). This is where schools come in and work to bridge this divide to make it smaller and equip all children with the skills to compete in life outside of school

I read a report into bridging the Digital Divide; Creating opportunities for marginalized young people to get together by VicHealth. The study was conducted over a 3 year period, exploring young people’s use of ICT and its potential use in mental health prevention and promotion initiatives. The review found young people are using technology in a variety of settings, however, due to marginalization young people were economically vulnerable to the cost of using technology and that service providers require more training and education to equip themselves with the skills to engage young people from marginalized communities in the use of ICT ( Blanchard et al., 2007). Perhaps that is what we need to do in Australia in particular is upskill our service providers and teachers to give them the skills to teach young people from these marginalized communities so that these young people can participate effectively in the digital world which starts with may even start in kindergarten to prepare our students for a bright digital future.

This week I created an infographic on the digital divide. Firstly what I needed to know to create the infographic was information about the digital divide and some statistics I could work with before I began to put the infographic together. The video we were given to watch for topic four, TEDxSanMigueldeAllende – Aleph Molinari – Bridging the Digital Divide, I found very informative this is where the majority of my information came from. While I am that almost 45 year old mother being referred to as part of the digital divide, I have been lucky enough to have continued studying and learning new skills when it comes to digital technology. I am aware though others are not as lucky, I have a friend who is 36 and she continually comes to me asking for help when it comes to technology and I don’t believe I am even close to being fluent in digital technology.

Once I had taken my information I then planned my infographic, I wanted the graph to be visually appealing, informative yet not containing a lot of words. This required careful planning; I wanted my infographic to flow into each section. Wordle (www.wordle.net/) was used to create a mash up of words from words I took to mean digital divide. Below is the Wordle I produced. If you click on the Wordle you will be directed to the original source.
Wordle: Untitled

I used Microsoft PowerPoint to create a pie chart to present the statistics, I inserted images I chose to represent the digital divide; different fonts and colours were used to create the information, I took all of this and created my infographic in Piktochart. I didn’t know Piktochart existed until now and it was so much fun to use, I can see children in a classroom using this and enjoying what they produce and it didn’t require a lot of skill either. I feel from grade 2 up in primary school would be very capable of using Piktochart. Large amounts of creativity could go into producing an infograph, students would be able to express themselves easily and in a fun way. I am hoping that my 8 year old daughter has a project coming up where I can introduce her to Pictochart and show her how to use it for her school work.
Infograph entry 2

The other infographics viewed on the discussion board varied either visually or with the information other students have captured. I particularly like Tehillah Newcombe’s, and how she represented the statistics of the digital divide on which I thought were African huts and a city, it was very different and very visually appealing.

I was happy with the feedback I received on my infographic; I was trying to achieve everything that Amanda said my infographic was like. I aimed for structured, clear and concise, I wanted it to be brief yet contain a lot of information with images and little wording; I think I achieved that.

References:

Blanchard, M. Metcalf, A. & Burns, J. (2007) Bridging the Digital Divide: Creating opportunities for marginalized young people to get connected. VicHealth. Retrieved 29 September 2014, from http://www.vichealth.vic.gov.au/~/media/ProgramsandProjects/Publications/Attachments/BridgingDigitalDivideReport2007.ashx.

Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT: Digital Pedagogies for Collaboration and Creativity. Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Victoria.

References for infograph:

Molinari, A. (2001, October 6). Bridging the Digital Divide. Retrieved 29 September 2014, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kaxCRnZ_CLg